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Triple-Negative Breast Cancer Symptoms

Triple-Negative Breast Cancer Symptoms, Lumps, Skin, Nipples

Triple-negative breast cancer symptoms are the same as symptoms associated with other types of breast cancer. Breast cancer symptoms vary widely — from lumps to swelling to skin changes — and many breast cancers have no obvious symptoms at all.

For breast cancers that have lumps, the lump in the breast can be any size, and often feels different from other breast tissue. With or without the presence of a lump, changes in the skin of the breast can also be a symptom of breast cancer. The skin can appear dimpled, red, scaly, irritated, and thick. Further, breast cancer can cause changes in the breast nipples. Nipple symptoms may include redness, pain, itchiness, a turning inward and a non-milk discharge from the nipple. (Breastcancer.org)

One of the most distinctive traits of triple-negative breast cancer is the rate at which it progresses. Triple-negative breast cancer is particularly aggressive, which means that it grows at a more rapid rate than other breast cancers. (Breastcancer.org)

If you find that you have any of these symptoms or are concerned about your breast health, please contact your healthcare provider.

The METRIC Study– A Clinical Trial of Glembatumumab vedotin (CDX-011) in Metastatic Triple-Negative Breast Cancer Over-expressing gpNMB

Doctors are conducting the METRIC Study to evaluate the safety and effectiveness of glembatumumab vedotin (CDX-011) in patients diagnosed with triple-negative breast cancer that has spread to other parts of the body. More than 250 patients with breast cancer or melanoma have received glembatumumab vedotin in prior research studies. Study results in both types of cancer support further testing of glembatumumab vedotin, particularly in patients with triple-negative breast cancer. If you have been diagnosed with triple-negative breast cancer that has spread beyond the original tumor, we hope that you will consider learning more about the METRIC Study. To find a study location near you to see if you may qualify, visit clinicaltrials.gov.